The CMA has published details of its agreement with Bijou, under which Bijou (as part of the impending legal proceedings) has agreed to review previous refund decisions and offer affected consumers who did not wish to postpone their marriage partial refunds reflecting the services they received prior to the cancellation. Bijou is required to clearly communicate this revised refund position to any affected consumer who has not rescheduled their wedding. We discuss each of these issues below in the context of the latest CMA guidelines. In summary, however, the CMA believes that a full refund should be offered to consumers if lockdown laws prevent marriages as agreed or if the services that can be provided are radically different from those initially agreed. However, the CMA identifies limited circumstances in which they state that companies can make small refund deductions, for example. B if the consumer has already received tailor-made products or if the company has already encouraged costs directly related to the wedding. Finally, the CMA has reservations about certain clauses aimed at restricting consumer rights which, under the Consumer Rights Act 2015, could be unfair and therefore unenforceable. As always, the position is not as clear as the CMA and, in the context of the three issues raised by the CMA, many of the general circumstances we have studied previously and in which it might be appropriate for consumer-oriented businesses to withhold full refunds still apply in this sector. This once again puts pressure on insurers to respect and resent their insurance contracts. Holding your head high and insisting that the newspaper be filled with bookings for 2022 and beyond is the only way to stay afloat in these difficult times. The CMA`s new guidelines mean venues may need to make more refunds, so it`s critical to continue generating new revenue to support your cash flow.

The end of 2021 and 2022 will be the busiest years for weddings in history, so now it`s time to secure this case as soon as possible. Finally, the pandemic has not stopped couples from getting engaged; Bridebook has registered 17,500 new couples since the beginning of August, 15% compared to the previous year! In order to clarify the last point of my original email, I listed how the CMA contradicted its own guidelines by complying with the number of retentions with Bijou Weddings: the CMA concluded that the proper retention it deems « fair » in the case of Bijou or, in other words, the amount of money, it is fair to deduct from consumer refunds 37.2% of the cost of the wedding. . . .